Deaf Rights Symposium Session Details

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Friday, August 18, 2017

Registration & Breakfast 7:30AM - 8:30AM

Session I: 8:30AM-10:00AM

  •   "Knowing Your Rights and Being Empowered to Succeed: My Story" - Dr. Michael Argenyi - Boston School of Public Health

    Dr. Michael Argenyi will discuss his personal experience utilizing the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for his disability rights in medical school education. He will discuss his own role in asserting his rights, other key players such as interpreters and hearing allies and their roles, and surprises and limitations under the ADA and Section 504. In closing, Michael will offer his thoughts on how to move forward in legitimatizing our rights and success as persons with hearing loss.

Break: 10:00AM-10:20AM

Session II: 10:20AM-11:50AM

  •   "Effective Communication and Video Remote Interpreting" - Howard A. Rosenblum and Caroline Jackson

    This session will examine the growing trend of providing interpreters via Video Remote Interpreting (VRI), a computer-based system that uses video conferencing technology to provide interpreters from a remote location. Presenters will explain the ways in which using VRI does and does not satisfy the ADA's requirement to ensure effective communication. Tips will be given for Title III entities to ensure they are using VRI in an ADA-compliant manner. Tips will be given for deaf patients and companions to ensure effective advocacy regarding their communication rights.

  •   "Fair Housing Testing Combats Fair Housing Discrimination Against the Deaf Community" - Ken Walden and Mary Rosenberg

    This session will provide an overview of a "sweep" of five cases Access Living filed in federal court based on fair housing tests that revealed discrimination against the Deaf housing applicants by five different housing providers. The session will include an overview of the Fair Housing Act and the fair housing rights of people with disabilities.

  •   "Effective Communication and the Americans with Disabilities Act" - Rachel Arfa and Rachel Weisberg

    This session will discuss what effective communication is under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), what applicable laws apply, and the definitions of auxiliary aids and services. Effective communication in specific criminal justice and entertainment will also be discussed.

  •   "ADA Basics" - Shannon Moutinho

    ADA Basics is an introductory level presentation on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), its various titles, and application. A brief clarification of what the ADA covers versus what is protected by other laws and will identify strategies to determine this difference. Information presented will illustrate what is required of individuals toward exercising their rights and fighting for continued enforcement of the protections of the ADA. Participants will be provided strategies and resources for responding to rights violations.

Lunch & Entertainment - 11:50AM-1:40PM

Session III - 1:40PM-3:10PM

  •  "Toolkit to Accommodations in Higher Education" - April Maman

    UIC strives to maintain a barrier-free environment so that students with disabilities can fully access classes, programs, services, and other campus activities. This session will explore legal requirements for reasonable accommodations versus best practices for d/Deaf/HH students in higher education and strategies for how to work with professors and administrative personnel who do not understand or are hesitant to engage accommodative practices. Providing and managing common accommodations such as CART, note-taking, and interpreting will discussed as well as more creative ideas toward achieving effective communication.

  •  "Overview of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission" - Traci Goodrich, Mardjon Hedayati, and Andrew Daley

    This session will discuss federal equal employment laws including the Americans with Disabilities Act Title I. This title prohibits employment discrimination based on disability and requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations throughout the employment process. The interactive workshop will provide detailed information about Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and demonstrate how the EEOC has taken step to become more accessible for to the Deaf community.

  •  "Mental Health and Deafness" - Paul May

    Providing mental health services is always a challenge but the issue of deafness adds a unique set of challenges. In this presentation, we will discuss a general introduction to Deafness and Mental Health as well as the specifics diagnoses that are seen more often in the Deaf Community and will leave with an ability to provide more culturally aware services to this population. Attendees will gain knowledge of what may look ‘different’ in a deaf person than a hearing person when assessing mental status and other diagnostic issues. Attendees will also learn of some of the pitfalls when using mental health assessment tests that are not standardized to this population.

  •  "Complications of Working with Trilingual Interpreters and Certified Deaf Interpreter" - Juan Bernal & Carmen Aguilar

    It is well recognized that ASL/Spanish/English trilingual interpreting is much more than interpreting between three languages. Every interpretation is also intersected by numerous cultures, with one or more of the cultures defined as having minority status. This workshop asks the learner to recognize and support the rich Deaf Latinx communities and appreciate the intersectional layers of identity. It has the learner take a step back and reflect on one's own culture, culture awareness, and worldview. The workshop further studies oppression and its impact on interpreting and the nuances of Latinx family dynamics on the interpretation setting.

Break - 3:10PM-3:30PM

Session IV - 3:30PM-5:00PM

  •  "Reading Between the LED Lines: Captioning vs. American Sign Language Interpretation at Theatre Events" - K. Crom Saunders

    A discussion of the pros and cons of providing real-time captioning as opposed to ASL interpretation, and why captioning may still not be the best form of accommodation. An examination of ASL interpretation as an advantage in language and artistic access.

  •  "Americans with Disabilities Act and Criminal Justice" - Rachel Arfa and Rachel Weisberg

    This session will provide background and overview of relevant laws that relate to law enforcement and criminal justice issues under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Specific topics that may be addressed include law enforcement, correctional facilities, re-entry issues, and criminal proceedings

  •  "Access in the Educational Setting" - Howard A. Rosenblum and Caroline Jackson

    This session will examine the rights of d/Deaf students to equal access in educational settings including primary, secondary, and post-secondary. It will explain the protections and limitations of the ADA as it applies to education, and make suggestions for deaf and hard of hearing individuals to engage in self-advocacy. The session will also go through the procedural requirements for advocating for your educational rights.

  •  "Health Literacy and Deaf People" - Teri Hedding

    Health literacy is fast-growing nationwide concern among health care professionals. It requires the patients' ability to navigate the health care systems from understanding their prescription drugs to the surgical procedures and treatments. Deaf people are no exception especially when they often experience lack of communication accessibility in the healthcare system. Multiple researches have shown that, even with a sign language interpreter, Deaf people, in general, struggle with health literacy. In the workshop, participants will have an opportunity to understand how low health literacy impacts the Deaf population's navigation through any healthcare system even with a sign language interpreter. Tips and tools will be shared as how hospitals can ensure that communication accessibility and patient experiences are effective for Deaf patients.

Opening Reception 5-7PM

Participants are invited to gather in the exhibit hall for a social hour of networking, opportunity to peruse exhibitor booths, and enjoy complimentary refreshments and hors devours.



Saturday, August 19, 2017

Registration & Breakfast: 7:30AM - 8:30AM

Session I - 8:30AM-10:00AM

  •  "Self-Advocacy In Employment" - Howard A. Rosenblum and Caroline Jackson

    This session will examine common barriers to employment and advancement in the deaf and hard of hearing community. It will explain the protections and limitations of the ADA as it applies to employment, and make suggestions for deaf and hard of hearing individuals to engage in self-advocacy. The session will also go through the procedural requirements for protecting your employment rights.

  •  "Police and the Deaf Community" - Jose Rios

    This presentation will include how the police interact with the Deaf community, the rights of Deaf people, and what to do if pulled over by a police officer. Also, how and when to request an ASL interpreter when dealing with the police. The presentation will also include what should happen and not happen when police are called. As well as what to do if a Deaf individual believes their rights have not been protected.

  •  "Health Literacy and Deaf People" (Repeat Session) - Teri Hedding

    Health literacy is a fast-growing, nationwide concern among healthcare professionals. It requires the patients' ability to navigate the healthcare systems from understanding their prescription drugs to surgical procedures and treatments. Deaf people are no exception especially when they often experience lack of communication accessibility in the healthcare system. Multiple researchers have shown that, even with a sign language interpreter, Deaf people, in general, struggle with health literacy. In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to understand how low health literacy impacts the Deaf population's navigation through any healthcare system even with a sign language interpreter. Tips and tools will be shared for the ways hospitals can ensure that communication accessibility and patient experiences are effective for Deaf patients.

  •  "Fair Housing Testing Combats Fair Housing Discrimination Against the Deaf Community"(Repeat Session) - Ken Walden and Mary Rosenberg

    We will provide an overview of a "sweep" of five cases we filed in federal court based on fair housing tests that revealed discrimination against the Deaf by five different housing providers. The session will include an overview of the fair housing rights of people with disabilities.

Break - 10:00AM-10:20AM

Session II - 10:20AM-11:50AM

  •  "Uh, Why are Certified Deaf Interpreters and Deaf Language Models Here Even Though We Have Interpreters?" - Patrick Fischer

    This information is a good resource to have of why Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDI) and Deaf Language Models (DLM) are provided and what they provide to the interpreting process. This will teach and explain the roles CDIs and DLMs have. Examples will show the varieties of Deaf users (non-standard American Sign Language, no language, foreign languages, Deaf-Blind, International Signs, etc.) and the numerous benefits that will come from having them as a part of the communication access team. Their understanding of the culture and deaf world is helpful in reducing clients' frustrations so they do not feel as though their feelings are being disregarded and to ensure clear understanding for everyone involved.

  •  "Legal and Law Enforcement" - Howard A. Rosenblum and Caroline Jackson

    This session will explain how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to the rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in jails and prisons. It will go through the disability rights laws that apply to jails and prisons, and the commonly needed accommodations for deaf and hard of hearing inmates, such as interpreters and videophones. Special attention will be given to recent legal developments and to the unique procedural requirements in jails and prisons.

  •  "Deaf-Blind Rights: A Road Least Traveled" (Repeat Session)- Ryan P. Odland and Chriss Woodfill

    Exercising one’s right to live and function in our society is a measure of being granted the freedom to choose towards shaping one’s future. By witnessing a person with combined hearing and vision loss exercise his or her right to seek employment, obtain a college degree and to have a family remains a mystery. The deaf-blind community was, at most, obstructed from many opportunities to benefit from information and resources available in the life a human being enriched and cherished: the ability to live and be allowed to choose, avail with options and possibilities. To allow a Deaf-Blind individual to learn from experience and mistakes would foster growth in actualizing their human right to lead a prosperous life with career and lifestyle most desired.

  •  "It Takes Three of Us: Theatrical ASL Interpreting" - Matt Andersen

    Theatre companies as well as novice to master level interpreters are often lost when it come to theatrical ASL interpreting. Drawing passion from wanting to bring theatre back into the d/Deaf community, participants will walk through the process that Matt Andersen (ASL coach/master/consultant) has been using with several theaters in Chicagoland and have a conversation about what theatre companies, interpreters and d/Deaf individual(s) can do to encourage more theaters to become deaf-friendly.

Lunch & Keynote 12-1:30PM

Keynote Leah Katz-Hernandez, former West Wing Receptionist for the President

Session III - 1:40PM-3:10PM

  •  "Service Animals and Federal Law" - Peter Berg

    Service animals are defined and viewed differently under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Fair Housing Act (FHA), and the Air Carriers Access Act (ACAA). Participants will learn how each of these laws provides protections for persons that are deaf, hard of hearing, or deaf/blind. Learn what businesses, governments, employers, airlines, and housing providers are or are not required to do. Become educated on permissible questions and/or permissible documentation a covered entity may ask or require from persons that are deaf, hard of hearing, or deaf/blind.

  •  "Systematic Change through Legislative Advocacy - Corey Axelrod and Jason Altmann

    Advocating for a positive systematic change through a legislative action is a challenge many individuals avoid taking on because it often seems to be a daunting, impossible task. When done correctly, a legislative advocacy effort creates a long-lasting, profound impact on the Deaf community where a legislation is implemented to address a systematic issue. A systematic change rarely comes with a complete overhaul but a series of moderate changes which makes it vital for you to be able to breakdown the systematic issue in smaller issues and prioritize them. You will leave the session empowered with the knowledge to take an action and make a difference in your community!

  •  "Differences in ADA understanding between hearing managers and the advocates who train them - Hayley Stokar

    Despite the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), Deaf workers still struggle with workplace accommodation. Managers often know very little about reasonable accommodations-particularly ASL interpretation-and this lack of knowledge contributes significantly to the problem. Advocates in social services and vocational rehabilitation are often the ones training and educating managers, yet strategies and information vary widely among trainers. This session will discuss ongoing qualitative research that aims to identify gaps between manager and trainer knowledge. The ultimate goal is to improve the quality of training related to workplace accommodations for Deaf individuals.

  •  "A Retrospective Look at Language Accessibility in the Deaf Community: Are We Visible?" - Paul May

    The Deaf community struggles with significant health disparities and is often excluded from health surveillances, outreach programs, and mass media healthcare messages. Deaf users of American Sign Language, through cultural and language barriers, are at high risk for poor health knowledge and inequitable access to medical and behavioral care in our health system. Oftentimes, some members of the Deaf community visit their doctors and mental health professionals less often, in part, due to limited access to direct communication. Although, the Americans with Disabilities Act mandates provision of effective health communication, many health care settings do not provide certificated and qualified medical and mental health interpreters. Finally, Deaf ASL users often embody a unique culture that is unfamiliar to medical and mental healthcare providers. This lack of cultural- and linguistic- competency on the part of the professional often results in higher rates of inaccurate evaluations, misdiagnoses and inappropriate treatments.

 

Break - 3:10PM-3:30PM

Panel - 3:30PM - 5:00PM

"ADA Progress: A Conversation with Stakeholders"

While the Americans with Disabilities Act has led to many victories for the protections of rights for d/Deaf/DeafBlind individuals, the fight for justice continues. Four panelists representing the national, state, and local levels in the fight for d/Deaf/DeafBlind rights will draw on their experience as litigators, advocates, service providers, community organizers and consumers to discuss current trends of ADA issues for the community. One hour will be facilitated by a moderator who will have prepared questions. Thirty minutes will be provided for questions from the audience. The intention of the panel is to raise consumers’ and service providers’ awareness of the problems, solutions and strategies for promoting social justice for d/Deaf/DeafBlind people in America.

  • Panelists:
    • Howard Rosenblum, Esq. – CEO of National Association of the Deaf
    • Rachel Arfa – IL ADA Project Manager and Attourney with Equip for Equality
    • Corey Axelrod – President of Illinois Association of the Deaf
    • Carla Mathers, Esq. – Corporate Counsel for TCS Interpreting

Dinner Break "On Your Own" 5:00pm - 7:00pm

See here for some options regarding dining in the area.

 

ASL Improv show: 7:00-9:00PM

Performers: Wink, K. Crom Saunders and Patrick Fischer

ASL Improv Featuring Crom, Mr Shineyhead (Patrick Fischer), Wink and maybe even special guests! Come enjoy overly sized eyebrows of Crom, the blinding light of Mr. Shineyhead, and a specially accommodating stage for the petite Wink. These performers will kick off the night with fun ASL improv games and could include you! Rated ASL-13 and ASL to English interpreters provided, so bring your friends that don't sign!



Sunday, August 20, 2017

Breakfast & Closing Plenary: 7:30AM - 8:30AM

Closing Plenary Robin Jones, Great Lakes ADA Center

Session I - 8:30am - 10:00am

  •  "Up On Stage! Access for the Deaf" - Patrick Fischer

    This information is about access for deaf audience members who enjoy any type of theater. It will provide information on how to find better access for the audience members. It will show several options to serve theaters with adequate access for the deaf's perspective; who can help to find qualified theatrical interpreters, the interpreters' skills to match the actor/actresses, time, who's responsible to develop access, etc. It will give you some of the ideas from several professional theaters which already have access for deaf audience members. This workshop also utilizes the ideas from the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's interpreting group's style and methodology. The workshop uses the theory from the Sign Coach (also called Director of Artistic Sign Language) perspective for deaf audience members.

  •   "From Filing a Complaint to Resolution: Understanding the Process" - Benro Ogunyipe

    This session presents "how to" file a charge of discrimination complaint if you were discriminated against on the basis of your deafness whether it occurred during the application, interviewing and hiring process, or in the workplace. A step-by-step walkthrough includes: What document paperwork do I need to file a formal complaint? What information do I need to include in the document paperwork? When is the deadline to file a complaint from the date of alleged discrimination? Which agency under jurisdiction do I file to a complaint with? How long is the investigation of my complaint? Do I need to hire a lawyer to represent me in the court? What remedies will I get if I won the intentional discrimination case? In addition, voluntary meditation and settlement as part of the resolution will be discussed.

  •   "Complications of Working with Trilingual Interpreters and Certified Deaf Interpreter" (Repeat Session) - Juan Bernal and Carmen Aguilar

    It is well recognized that ASL/Spanish/English trilingual interpreting is much more than interpreting between three languages. Every interpretation is also intersected by numerous cultures, with one or more of the cultures defined as having minority status. This workshop asks the learner to recognize and support the rich Deaf Latinx communities and appreciate the intersectional layers of identity. It has the learner take a step back and reflect on one's own culture, culture awareness, and worldview. The workshop further studies oppression and its impact on interpreting and the nuances of Latinx family dynamics on the interpretation setting.

  •  "Differences in ADA understanding between hearing managers and the advocates who train them" (Repeat Session) - Hayley Stokar

    Despite the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), Deaf workers still struggle with workplace accommodation. Managers often know very little about reasonable accommodations-particularly ASL interpretation-and this lack of knowledge contributes significantly to the problem. Advocates in social services and vocational rehabilitation are often the ones training and educating managers, yet strategies and information vary widely among trainers. This session will discuss ongoing qualitative research that aims to identify gaps between manager and trainer knowledge. The ultimate goal is to improve the quality of training related to workplace accommodations for Deaf individuals.

Break: 10:00AM-10:20AM

Session II - 10:20AM - 11:50AM

  •   "Police and the Deaf Community" (Repeat Session) - Jose Rios

    This presentation will include how the police interact with the Deaf community, the rights of Deaf people, and what to do if pulled over by a police officer. Also, how and when to request an ASL interpreter when dealing with the police. The presentation will also include what should happen and not happen when police are called. As well as what to do if a Deaf individual believes their rights have not been protected.

  •  "Deaf-Blind Rights: A Road Least Traveled" (Repeat Session)- Ryan P. Odland and Chris Woodfill

    Exercising one’s right to live and function in our society is a measure of being granted the freedom to choose towards shaping one’s future. By witnessing a person with combined hearing and vision loss exercise his or her right to seek employment, obtain a college degree and to have a family remains a mystery. The deaf-blind community was, at most, obstructed from many opportunities to benefit from information and resources available in the life a human being enriched and cherished: the ability to live and be allowed to choose, avail with options and possibilities. To allow a Deaf-Blind individual to learn from experience and mistakes would foster growth in actualizing their human right to lead a prosperous life with career and lifestyle most desired.

  •   "Access in Museums: The Art Institute's Gallery Tour" - Jonathan Sondergeld, Cicely Boggan and Jennifer Hart

    Solving the issue of access in museums and addressing the deprivation of cultural learning experiences in Deaf/HH patrons that is associated with lack of language access

  •   "Your Day in Court: How do I talk with the judge?" - Carla Mathers

    This session will present the judicial system's legal obligations under the ADA to provide communication access to Deaf, Deaf-blind and hard of hearing individuals. This session will define the various roles of interpreters in the legal setting and set forth whom is responsible for their provision. Advocacy strategies for obtaining interpreters for various legal matters such as law office visits, jury duty, civil and criminal matters will be discussed. In small groups, participants will apply the advocacy strategies in role plays.

 

Last Updated on:
Tue May 23, 2017